https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/issue/feed Thammasat Review 2021-01-12T10:18:14+07:00 Associate Professor Dr. Peter Ractham thammasatreview@tu.ac.th Open Journal Systems <p style="text-align: justify;">The Thammasat Review is a peer-reviewed journal published by the Research Administration Division of Thammasat University. The journal has been publishing articles since 1996 and started its online platform in 2014. Its primary focus is on advancing academic debates and enhancing the development of knowledge within the social sciences and humanities in the broadest sense of the terms. All submissions go through initial screening by our editorial team prior to a double blind peer-reviewed process by two anonymous referees that are highly regarded within their field. The journal accepts English-language manuscripts of original research and review articles which have never been published elsewhere. With journals accepting articles in the category of academic articles, research articles, book reviews and case studies etc.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Areas covered in our journal include:</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">– Humanities<br>– Political Economy<br>– Economics<br>– Business and Management Sciences<br>– International Politics<br>– Law<br>– History<br>– Liberal Arts<br>– Sociology and anthropology</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A necessary condition for publication in Thammasat Review is that the answer to a research question needs to make a significant scholarly contribution to the service of society, promotion of arts and culture, social equality and social justices under the philosophies of constitution and democracy.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Thammasat Review is published two volumes per annum (June and December) with support from Thammasat University, however the opinions expressed are those of the authors.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Print ISSN</strong>: 0859-5747</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Online ISSN</strong>: 2630-0303</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Language</strong>: English</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Publication Fee</strong>: Free</p> https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239865 An Analysis of Consumer Preference Towards Thai Products on Chinese E-Commerce Platform 2020-11-26T08:58:37+07:00 Monthinee Teeramungcalanon monthinee.t@pbic.tu.ac.th <p style="text-align: justify;">China’s e-commerce industry has grown exponentially over the past decade and has become an important channel for international goods to access the expansive Chinese consumer base particularly at a time when demands for imported goods are on the rise. Thai products, in particular, are popular with online Chinese consumers due to the perception of them being closely associated with local wisdom and thus unique. Nevertheless, there remain several factors that hinder the sales of Thai products on Chinese e-commerce platforms.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This study aims to explore Chinese consumer preference towards Thai products on e-commerce platforms by examining the factors that affect consumers. Results from online surveys of 124 Chinese respondents in three first-tier high-purchasing power cities of China indicate that product information quality for Thai products is the most essential factor with a significant positive effect on consumer satisfaction. However, trust, electronic word-of-mouth and price consciousness have an insignificant effect on consumer satisfaction. Moreover, consumer satisfaction is found to significantly influence and exert a mediating role in the increase of Chinese consumers towards Thai products. Even though these results differ from the previous studies, they havehed light on the significance of product information quality as the decisive factor that affects consumer satisfaction over electronic word-of-mouth, trust and price consciousness due to the intrinsic characteristics and unique nature of Thai products.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Thai manufacturers and retailers should pay greater attention to enhancing product information quality which, in turn, will be favorable for improving consumer satisfaction, purchasing behavior, and will help to further penetrate the Chinese online market.</p> 2020-10-26T13:18:32+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/235361 A Study of Tourist Motivation toward Destination Loyalty: Targeting European Tourists Travelling to Phuket 2021-01-11T16:09:19+07:00 Phisunt Tinakhat phisunt@yahoo.com <p style="text-align: justify;">This quantitative research aimed to study tourist motivation toward destination loyalty by focusing on European tourists who travel to Phuket, where is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Thailand. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 200 respondents to collect the primary data, while multiple regression and path analyses were employed to test the research hypotheses. The results of the survey revealed that push and pull factors had directly positive influences on destination loyalty to Phuket. Additionally, the study also proved that push and pull factors were indirectly affected by destination loyalty via tourist satisfaction.&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; To maintain and retrieve European tourists to Phuket, safety and security systems and the quality of tourist attractions and infrastructures in Phuket should be well-maintained. Moreover, tourism stakeholders in Phuket should focus on the important aspects of push and pull factors, so they can attract not only European tourists, but also other markets to boost tourist satisfaction.</p> 2020-11-24T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/236442 Is the Modern Middle Class the Proletariat?: Marx's Concept of the Proletariat Class 2020-11-26T08:59:11+07:00 Wanpat Youngmevittaya wanpatyoung@gmail.com <p style="text-align: justify;">Karl Marx predicts that an advanced capitalist society would end up with class polarization between the very small number of the rich capitalist class and the very large number of the poor proletariat class. There seems to be no place for the modern middle class who sells their labours for wages or incomes but has different ways of life and a better standard of living than the working class. However, the social reality after Marx's time seems to contradict his prediction – the quite stable existence of the modern middle class makes Marx's prediction untrue. Some scholars who claim themselves as Marxists would argue that the modern middle class should be counted as the proletariat class, and so, Marx's prediction still holds in the present time. This paper argues that, according to Marx, the modern middle class cannot be counted as the proletariat class. It proposes a distinction between the proletariat class in general and the revolutionary proletariat class, in which when Marx discusses class polarization he always refers to the latter kind only. The modern middle class may be viewed as the proletariat class in general but cannot be counted as the revolutionary proletariat class because they do not have objective conditions such as collective benefits and ways of life that would allow them to develop class consciousness for a socialist revolution. The revolutionary proletariat class, according to Marx, refers only to the factory worker whose work and way of life are forced to live together and to aim for the same goal – a socialist revolution; they would want to destroy the alienation between the actual alienated life and the real human essence.</p> 2020-11-24T09:47:18+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/237672 Ban Khee Thao, a Site of Political History, and a Symbolic Space of Resistance and Land Politics of the Hmong in Thailand 2020-11-26T08:59:23+07:00 Yutthapong Suebsakwong yutthapong_s@cmu.ac.th Ian G. Baird yutthapong_s@cmu.ac.th <p style="text-align: justify;">The aim of this paper is to study a Hmong social movement that has its roots in the Cold War and is focused on their requesting the return of land concerning Ban Khee Thao. The community in question is located in the border area of three provinces of Phitsanulok, Phetchabun, and Loei in Thailand.In this study, Ban Khee Thao - a community that was physically dissolved during the Cold War - is a site of the Hmong political history and the imagined and symbolic space of resistance.A group of Phu Pattana Chat Thai, or Collaborators for Developing the Thai Nation (CFDTN), formerly with the Communist Party of Thailand, are focusing their efforts on requesting permission to go back to their domicile community or “qub zej qub zos” in Hmong, drawing on the Thai government amnesty policy 66/23 from 1980. The emergence of Ban Khee Thao and this social movement represent the Hmong being, which follows Edward Soja’s tri-alectics of Spatiality, Historicality, and Sociality, rooted by Lefebvre’s theory, and which are concerned with the social production of struggle. The Hmong being of social struggle, according to our study, demonstrates that the Hmong have a long history of struggling to adapt themselves to the political environment and diverse forms of domination and destruction. They have faced robbery and disease, the Cold War which has been running up until today and the symbolic struggle of land politics which social memory and political history are the site. This analysis of Hmong being emphasizes the heterogeneity of Hmong society and that the Hmong are not just a unified semi-nomadic group of tribal people, as is often presented in structuralist depictions included in some agrarian and cultural studies of the Hmong (people). Therefore, this study presents their diverse roles (that are) involved in each political situation.</p> 2020-11-24T09:51:35+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/238435 Japanese Ways of Molding Quality People -Japanese Perspective on Thai People: Appropriate behaviors for a Harmonious Coexistence in Society- 2020-11-26T08:59:34+07:00 Warintorn Wuwongse warintornw@gmail.com Suneerat Neancharoensuk warintornw@gmail.com Piyanuch Wiriyaenawat warintornw@gmail.com Yukie Nanakorn warintornw@gmail.com <p>The purpose of this research is to introduce the Japanese way of molding quality people and how it can be applied to Thailand. This is for the development of Thailand’s human resources as well as for its economic development. This study focuses on 3 topics: 1.Thai people from a Japanese perspective on appropriate behaviors for harmonious coexistence in society, 2.Japanese based expectations concerning appropriate behavior for harmonious existence in society through material taught in Moral Education and books on manners, and 3. Role of Japanese schools and families in molding quality people. The research methodology involves an opinion survey using questionnaire, interview and observation of classroom teaching.<br>The findings reveal that the most important word/phrase indicative of Japanese behavior and conduct is not disturbing others. The way to do so is through self-discipline. This is the essence in the development of Japanese quality people. Besides not disturbing others, Japanese people are taught not to disturb the environment and nature. This way of molding is practiced in the same way across the country and is not confined to certain specific areas. Families, schools and the society all teach this practice, thus making such molding very effective. Teaching in schools is put into practice until it becomes a habit. This is not something learned by heart. Rather, this practice is firmly based on concrete objectives as well as rules and regulations. How to live a harmonious life with others in society is carefully and subtly instilled into people. This same way of conduct is seen across the nation and can be said to represent Japanese culture.</p> 2020-11-24T10:24:46+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239843 Gender Differences in Young Consumers’ Intentions to Redeem Mobile Coupons Using an Application: A Case of 7-Eleven Convenience Stores 2020-11-26T08:59:50+07:00 Warinrampai Rungruangjit r_warinrampai@hotmail.com <p style="text-align: justify;">The purpose of this research is to introduce the Japanese way of molding quality people and how it can be applied to Thailand. This is for the development of Thailand’s human resources as well as for its economic development. This study focuses on 3 topics: 1. Japanese perspectives on Thai people, focusing on appropriate behaviors for a harmonious coexistence in society, 2 Japanese based expectations concerning appropriate behavior for a harmonious existence in society through material taught in Moral Education and books on manners, and 3. Role of Japanese schools and families in molding quality people. The research methodology involves an opinion survey using questionnaire, interview and observation of classroom teaching.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The findings reveal that the most important word/phrase indicative of Japanese behavior and conduct is not disturbing others. The way to do so is through self-discipline. This is the essence in the development of Japanese quality people.&nbsp; Besides not disturbing others, Japanese people are taught not to disturb the environment and nature. This way of molding is practiced in the same way across the country and is not confined to certain specific areas. Families, schools and Japanese society all teach this practice, thus making such molding very effective. Teaching in schools is put into practice until it becomes a habit. This is not something learned by heart. Rather, this practice is firmly based on concrete objectives as well as rules and regulations. How to live a harmonious life with others in society is carefully and subtly instilled into people. This same way of conduct is seen across the nation and can be said to represent Japanese culture. The research team would like to end with recommendations on appropriate behaviors that may be useful to incorporate in the Thai education system.</p> 2020-11-24T00:00:00+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239856 Contribution of Cultural Intelligence to Job Performance of Domestic Hotel Employees in Thailand: The Mediating Roles of communication Effectiveness and Job Stress 2020-11-26T09:00:04+07:00 Akaraphun Ratasuk akaraphunrat@gmail.com <p style="text-align: justify;">This study investigated the contributions of cultural intelligence (CQ) on job performance. Communication effectiveness and job stress were proposed as two competencies that mediated the linkage between cultural intelligence and job performance. Survey data were collected from 427 frontline employees working for domestic chain hotels in Thailand. The results computed from a partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis showed that communication effectiveness and job stress mediated the linkage between cultural intelligence and job performance of the frontline hotel employees. The results also showed that communication effectiveness negatively and partially mediated the relationship between CQ and job stress, and job stress positively and partially mediated the relationship between communication effectiveness and job performance of the frontline hotel employees. The findings indicate that CQ can improve frontline hotel employees' job performance by increasing their communication effectiveness and reducing their job stress.</p> 2020-11-24T10:33:17+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239854 The Vocational Education System in Thailand and Singapore: A Sociological Perspective 2020-11-26T09:00:17+07:00 Saranya Tarat teera.sd@gmail.com Teera Sindecharak teera.sd@gmail.com <p style="text-align: justify;">This article focuses on studying vocational situations in Thailand and comparing vocational education systems between Thailand and Singapore. This study consisted of interviews with personnel in organizations related to vocational education in Thailand and Singapore. In total 29 people were interviewed. From the study, it was found that the Thai vocational education system was created to be an educational choice for students. However, in this system of education, there are still many issues that arise from the planning and policies in vocational education management; such as the gap in university education, shortage of personnel and budget issues. These problems affect the development of teaching styles and production of personnel that meet the needs of the changing labor market as technological advances. Also, a major drawback to the system is that it is based on the negative attitude of society towards vocational education. These negative attitudes have an effect on school decisions and social opportunities. When comparing the vocational system with Singapore 4 issues emerged 1) The vocational education management system, 2) Guidelines for vocational education development, 3) Vocational education curriculum and 4) Vocational education and teaching styles. These results reflect the success cases of the management and cooperation of schools and industry which can produce skilled personnel and also meets the needs of the labor market. This success has led to a change in society's attitude towards vocational education and resulted in an educational system that has gained popularity in Singapore.</p> 2020-11-24T10:37:37+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239874 Transitional Relations of China and Myanmar: A New Economic Geography Approach to the Mandalay- Ruili Road Connection 2020-11-26T09:00:28+07:00 Nattapon Tantrakoonsab nuttaponir@gmail.com <p style="text-align: justify;">This article explores the function of a transnational road in China-Myanmar relations from a perspective that reflects on Myanmar’s experience. The analysis focuses on economic activities at the city level, in order to assess advantages and disadvantages to the relationship between both countries. The cities that were chosen as the units of analysis are Ruili and Mandalay. Using a New Economic Geography approach, a core-periphery pattern was applied as the theoretical framework to explain industrial relocation and agglomeration.&nbsp; In addition, this article also highlights the political and economic transitions in Myanmar since 2010 that led to change in the relational structure.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The article makes two key points. Firstly, Myanmar’s dependent relationship with China is illuminated if one applies a New Economic Geography perspective to economic processes. The road played a role in the process by which Ruili was transformed into an industrialized core and Mandalay became an agricultural periphery. Secondly, the core-periphery relation is not static. At least 3 factors from the Myanmar side such as the border situation, forest policy and special economic zone policy that launched after 2011 country’s reformation have impacted the relational structure.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The latter point indicates that China’s influence is greatly contested by the smaller country, and that the interaction of economic and political factors impact the Myanmar-China relationship, particularly at local sites.</p> 2020-11-24T10:40:57+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239883 The Philippine Mango Industry Governance, Prospects, and Recommendations: The Case of Guimaras Province 2021-01-12T10:18:14+07:00 Noe John Joseph E. Sacramento nesacramento@up.edu.ph Atty. Cyril Bryan D. Cuizon nesacramento@up.edu.ph <p style="text-align: justify;">The agricultural industry in the Philippines is an essential driver of the economy, faced with compelling issues surrounding governance in responding to the immediate needs and concerns of the sector. This study aims to examine how governance works in the mango industry of Guimaras. Both descriptive and analytical, this case study utilized qualitative research methods. Primary data from thirty key informants and secondary data from representatives of government offices that relate to the agricultural development agenda of the province were gathered. Also, secondary data from government reports and the world wide web were utilized. Qualitative data analysis QDA and thematic analysis were instrumental in the study. The findings reveal that the Province of Guimaras provides policies, programs, and projects essential to the development of the mango industry. The focus of the province is to boost the local mango economy for both domestic and international markets. This notwithstanding, there are issues that the industry is confronted with, particularly with its working sector. Using the UNESCAP’s good governance framework, the study identified the key issues and concerns of the mango industry workers. In gist, through good governance, the mango industry has not only the potential to boost the province’s economy but also is vital to the interests and economic needs of its workers. In this vein, the Guimaras mango industry should address the concerns of its workers through the provision of services and assistance to help the sector, with the end goal of boosting mango production.</p> 2020-11-24T10:46:09+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239863 Private Public Space: The Transformation of Rattanakosin Island 2020-11-26T09:00:52+07:00 Tonkao Panin panin_t@silpakorn.edu <p style="text-align: justify;">This research aims to explore Rattanakosin Island and the transformation of its spatial structure, in both its practical and theoretical aspects. It intends to examine the changes within the city fabric and public spaces during the past two hundred years focusing on the practical, functional, as well as representational and symbolic aspects.&nbsp; The research also involves an investigation into the concept of private and public spaces. It investigates ways in which we relate to the spatial structure of the city, whether the definition of our private and public spaces similar to those of the West, as well as the criteria for the creation as well as transformation of the city fabric in different social and cultural contexts. The research employs two interrelated methods of historical-literature studies and physical surveys of actual street and space patterns in Rattanakosin Island. It is found that for the spatial uniqueness for Rattanakosin Island, being a part of the public means being a part of a specific community, rather than being a part of a city as whole. Public does not mean universal but refers to socio-cultural specificities of each community. Public space for the Thais in Rattanakosin Island is thus an extension of private domain, separate from it, yet closely linked and connected. It is the type of public that allows one to truly share and exchange personal contacts, rather than to observe and remain unseen as that of the West.&nbsp; Only when we understand these issues, can we begin to explore the possibilities to design architectural constructs that are truly embedded within our city fabric.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> 2020-11-24T10:49:55+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239873 Big Data and Social Media Qualitative Research Methodology 2020-12-22T14:37:54+07:00 Papon Chongthanavanit icemantop@gmail.com John M. Kennedy icemantop@gmail.com Jantima Kheokao icemantop@gmail.com <p>The paper demonstrates and evaluates a methodology for conducting big data and social media research using qualitative methods. Large-scale databases of customer-generated content in social media have captured scientific attention, producing an abundance of valuable information. However, only a few studies have used a qualitative approach to analyze big data. This paper presents the step by step process of managing big data and qualitative analyses integrating computational approaches. It is based on a study of dental tourism in Thailand as a case example to validate as well as to highlight the advantages and limitations of the methodology.</p> 2020-12-22T10:37:35+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review https://sc01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tureview/article/view/239902 A Study on the Effect of CEO Discovery DNA on Productivity 2020-12-24T09:41:46+07:00 Dae-Geun Kim essekim7447@gmail.com <p>This study starts with the question of what is the manager's ability to innovate and tries to confirm its effect on productivity from the point of view of discovery DNA. Research into managers’ innovation, which has been conducted in previous studies, focuses on&nbsp; the learning and ability development of managers, so there were many discussions from the perspective of responding to changes in the corporate environment. However, this study was approached from the viewpoint of the competency that is inherent in managers. Discovery DNA was suggested by Dyer et al. (2011) while explaining the difference between innovative entrepreneurs and ordinary entrepreneurs, and refers to five abilities: ‘questioning’, ‘observing’, ‘networking’, ‘experimenting’ and ‘associating’. The data in this study were collected from 277 companies headquartered in Korea, which were classified by size, with 62 (28%) being large companies and 149 (71%) small companies. As a result of the analysis, it was found that “questioning” and “networking” were statistically significant components of discovery DNA, which is the manager's innovation ability, and had a positive (+) effect on productivity.</p> 2020-12-22T10:46:26+07:00 Copyright (c) 2020 Thammasat Review